Blog and News Summary

Most Recent and Featured Blogs

by: Frank Flegel
Updated on : April 24, 2018

Kentucky Governor Matt Bevin is a republican and probably considered to be on the Right side of the political spectrum as are most Republicans but he had some interesting things to day about culture, following the Florida school shootings. He sees the cause as a culture of violence that exists in the U.S and I believe what he says about that can apply equally in Canada.

what do you expect Bevin says when we have lost all respect for human life. there isn’t a kid under 12 that hasn’t been exposed to pornography that shows no respect for women; Violent video games that award points if...

more
by: Frank Flegel
Updated on : March 28, 2018

I didn’t get to both days of the MyGen rally but I was really impressed with what I did see on Sunday.  I took in  a couple of breakout sessions Sunday afternoon the presenters were young adults, a couple of the 70 who volunteered to help out over the two days.

They were articulate, animated and used humour in their presentation and for the most part were able to hold the attention of their teen-age audiences, but teens being teens and a dance the night before and few were head nodding before each session was over. The atmosphere was really electric, it was like a two-day party with...

more
by: Frank Flegel
Updated on : March 8, 2018

On November 29, 2016, I began a journey not of my choosing. I suffered what the doctors called a huge stroke. It has left me with some vision loss, which is more annoying than debilitating, but does cause me some difficulty. I’ll explain later, that is if you care to continue reading.  I write this in the hope  that others may pay attention and seek medical aid for what initially may seem minor but could be a warning of something more serious.

November 28th we were walking along the Main street in Waikiki, when I started getting a headache which I attributed to the sun. I...

more
by: Brett Salkeld
Updated on : October 16, 2017

 

While many parents and community members are relieved and gratified by the Bishops of Saskatchewan’s recent decision to rescind the letter expressing concerns regarding the HPV vaccine and issue a new letter in its place, others are troubled.  It seems to some that such a decision by the Bishops is evidence of a weakening of Church teaching on chastity and even that the Bishops were cowed into submission by a hostile media.  Here at the Archdiocese we have heard from many who were confused and hurt by the first letter but also from...

more
by: Susan Klein
Updated on : August 24, 2017

This summer I definitely needed some time to come away and rest awhile.

So, I decided to take a few days on my own at the cabin.  I took a couple of things to do, a couple books to read, my Bible (and a study guide), my journal.

The first few days were about settling in and watching a couple of movies.  Some time was spent in praise and prayer for my family and for a couple of others who came to mind.  I read a lot too,...

more
by: Brett Salkeld
Updated on : June 28, 2017

I’ve been working for the Church for about 4 years now.  And, as anyone involved in parish or diocesan life knows, that means I’ve been at my share of meetings.  It seems to me that there are a few themes that show up at most such meetings.  One of the most common in my experience is the question of hospitality.  I suspect that this did not start 4 years ago.  Rather, one imagines decades of visiting and revisiting this question.  The Church, we all agree and insist, must be welcoming.

This is often brought up with reference...

more
by: Brett Salkeld
Updated on : January 6, 2017

By Brett Salkeld

This is the last of a three-part series.

In this third of a series on raising kids Catholic I want to talk about some of the particular challenges our culture presents to us as Catholic parents trying to pass on the faith to our children. Can we identify with some precision certain cultural factors that are working against us, so as to effectively counter them?

It would be too easy to simply compile a list of complaints about contemporary culture. What I hope to do instead is to identify one key issue and show...

more
by: Leona Burkhart
Updated on : January 4, 2017

Oh My!

It has been over a year since the Protocol Department posted a blog.  I guess one would have to say that Sharon and I are not frequent bloggers. 

It has been a few years since we began the Screening Process for volunteers in Parishes.  And as we become more comfortable with the process, I hope we have not become more lax.

It is still important to screen people and keep our records up to date.  It would probably be a good idea to check on the dates of the Criminal Record checks on file.  Some may need to be updated or will soon need to be updated.  Sending out early...

more
by: Susan Klein
Updated on : December 9, 2016

Cookies in a PanThese days my thoughts keep drifting towards Christmas Day.  How the day will look, who will come and how to spend the day?   Plans about food are the most consuming.    I am part of a cookie share this year, so that will be fun.   I look forward to the walk to Mass on Christmas Day.  I live on a tree lined street, with several other Catholic families.   So as we walk in the snow to Church, families...

more
by: Brett Salkeld
Updated on : November 1, 2016

This is the second of a three-part series, originally posted in the Prairie Messenger.

In the first part of this series we looked at things we can do in the home to help our kids appropriate the faith given to them in their baptism. Much more could be said, and my suggestions could serve just as well as sparks to your own imagination as examples to strictly follow. The larger point is to be intentional about your life of faith in the home.  

But our faith is not a private family affair. It is also concerned with our whole Christian community. How can a family...

more
by: Brett Salkeld
Updated on : November 1, 2016

Any bishop will tell you that one of the most heartbreaking parts of his job is meeting with elderly parishioners who lament that their children no longer participate in the life of the Church.  

Parents in my own generation, whose children are perhaps not yet teenagers (my oldest is 9), often face the future with some anxiety.  Will our children continue on in the life of faith we have begun with them, or will they drift away like many in the generations before them?  

It is easy to get discouraged when we see and hear...

more
by: Brett Salkeld
Updated on : September 22, 2016

Tara writes to ask how best to respond to people who say that Christ’s presence in the Eucharist isn’t real, it’s just symbolic.

Thanks for the question Tara!

I think there are at least two complementary ways of approaching this.  The first is the most common.  Catholics who want to defend the claim that Christ is REALLY present in the Eucharist turn to Scripture.  There we can find extremely realistic language.  At the institution of the Eucharist Jesus says “This is my body,” not “This signifies or represents or symbolizes my body.”  That argument alone was enough for...

more
by: Frank Flegel
Updated on : September 13, 2016

Mother Teresa is now a Saint. Proclaimed to that title September 4, by Pope Francis, a day before the 19th anniversary of her death September 5 1997.

St. Peter’s square was packed, as usual, for the ceremony and while most of the coverage was positive there remain a few dissenters that the move was too soon after her death. The same thing was said of St. John Paul II who was canonized April 27, 2015 just nine years after his April 2 2005 death. St. John XXIII was Canonized at the same time as John Paul II but he at least had been dead for about 61 years.

In the...

more
by: Frank Flegel
Updated on : September 6, 2016

September is here, the children are back in school, the garden is almost completely harvested except for some corn, potatoes and several squash. Not a bad crop this year. Time to get back to the usual routine.

Us Catholics lament the state of our faith in the western world, but Reginald Bibby, in his new book co-authored with pollster Angus Reid, says Catholics today are doing well thanks largely to immigration. Three thousand people were polled in 2015 by the Angus Reid group.

The Western Catholic Reporter published an article, picked up by the Prairie Messenger in last week...

more
by: Brett Salkeld
Updated on : July 12, 2016

This is the fourth of a five-part series.

In the first three parts of this series I have tried to paint a bleak picture of what the legal availability of physician-assisted suicide means for vulnerable individuals and Canadian culture generally. On the other hand, while this legal battle seems unwinnable at this stage, I am not without hope. The church has lived through bleak times before. 

While history is no picnic, Christianity offers us great resources for dealing with evil. In the final two instalments of this series I want to look at those resources. Today we will...

more
by: Brett Salkeld
Updated on : June 28, 2016

Last Tuesday, I was lucky to be a member of an ecumenical and interfaith delegation that went to the provincial legislature to present a joint statement calling for more palliative care in our province and conscience rights for health care workers and institutions in light of Canada's new laws on assisted suicide.  The delegation included Roman and Ukrainian Catholic, Anglican, Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, Evangelical, and Muslim delegates and represented a much larger group of signatories to the joint statement that included Jewish, Muslim, and a great many Christian...

more
by: Frank Flegel
Updated on : June 28, 2016

We haven’t heard the end of the Euthanasia, medically assisted suicide, and whatever other euphemism is employed to describe legal murder, debate.

The House of Commons and the Canadian Senate passed Bill C-14 which makes medically assisted suicide legal, but the bill does not go as far the Supreme Court ruling in the Carter Case. The result is very likely to mean more court challenges to force the federal government, through the Supreme Court, and I’ll say more about that in a moment, to widen the criteria.

The Supreme Court ruling allowing medically assisted...

more
by: Brett Salkeld
Updated on : July 12, 2016

While it is not necessary to appeal to Scripture or the authority of the Church to demonstrate that assisted suicide is bad for people and for society (you’ll notice I made no such appeals in the first four parts of this series), that does not mean that Christian faith is of no help for our present situation. 

It should be possible to demonstrate from rational principles accessible to people of all faiths (or none) that assisted suicide is an evil.  And Catholics are generally happy to approach the public square with arguments that do not require faith in order to be accepted...

more
by: Susan Klein
Updated on : June 14, 2016

When I was growing up, going to the lake was always one of my favorite things to do.  There was swimming, playing in the sand, watching water skiers and boats go past me as I sat and gazed at the open water. I could sit on the swing and read for hours.  I took long walks to the natural spring just to feel the coolness of the water and the smooth stones under my feet.  Those are still some of my favorite things to do. 

Not favored so much by me, but was by my Dad, was fishing.  And berry picking.  I would think, sitting in a boat for hours in the summer sun, or in the bushes with the...

more
by: Frank Flegel
Updated on : May 24, 2016

The Saskatchewan Legislative Assembly opened as normal on May 17 with the opening prayer which has garnered some recent criticism. Here’s what the controversy, or what passes as controversy, is all about.

Present us O Lord in all our doings, with Thy Most gracious favour; and further us with Thy continual help, that in all our works, begun, continued and ended in Thee, we may glorify Thy Holy Name, and finally by Thy Mercy, attain everlasting life.

Amen.

This all came about because of a Supreme Court ruling...

more
by: Brett Salkeld
Updated on : May 30, 2016

By Brett Salkeld

The following is the third of a five-part series.

We live in a culture that makes an idol out of choice. In our basic and unquestioned public discourse choice per se, without any reference to the object of that choice, is seen as a basic good. Choice is understood as the sine qua non for authentic human freedom. Take away someone’s choice in any matter and you limit their freedom. This is seen as acceptable only when their choice might harm others.

It should not be surprising, then, that while the initial...

more
by: Brett Salkeld
Updated on : May 12, 2016
This is the second of a five-part series.  In the first part of this series we looked at the claim that, “An assisted dying law would not result in more people dying, but in fewer people suffering.” We saw that, while the statement is true, it is irrelevant. No kind of killing increases the number of people dying for the simple reason that everybody dies. But there is another problem with this statement: it imagines death as the solution to suffering. This is a dangerous idea. People contemplating suicide do not want to die. They can simply see no other way out of their...
more
by: Brett Salkeld
Updated on : April 27, 2016

This is the first of a five-part series on assisted suicide by Archdiocesan Theologian Brett Salkeld.  It is being co-published on his Archdiocesan blog sAsk-a-Theologian and in the Prairie Messenger every two weeks.  Parishes are very welcome to print and distribute this material in their Sunday bulletins and to provide the link to this blog in their bulletins and other communications platforms, i.e., Facebook pages, e-mail listservs, etc. ____________________________________________

When faced with difficult discussions surrounding...

more
by: Frank Flegel
Updated on : April 20, 2016

Pope Francis recent pronouncements on contraception, marriage and the family has rattled the more conservative folks in our Roman Catholic Church. He hasn’t changed doctrine but he seems to have stretched the envelope quite a bit.

Take for example his comment that “contraception is the least evil” when referring to the Zika virus infecting South American countries and now making its way into the southern U.S. The mosquito borne virus appears to infect children in the womb and they are born with a small head which affects their cognitive ability. At least that’s what...

more
by: Susan Klein
Updated on : April 20, 2016

My family has been going through some tough stuff this past little while.   My children’s grandmother has passed away.  She was 94 years old, a happy, good, caring woman.  She loved to laugh, to go shopping and to cook for her children.   She lived a long, fruitful, strong Catholic life. She was a mother to me.

Each member of our family sits with our own memories, memories of our love for her, her love for us, memories of family times, some good and some not so good. Our household is kind of quiet these days.   It is a place of sadness. 

One thing that I notice about myself...

more

Pages

Employment